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Profiling

Questions, problems, comments and tips regarding the 3d scanning process.

Profiling

Postby alterco » Fri Oct 17, 2014 9:42 am

Hi,

I would like to extract the cross section of some objects.
So, I wonder if David laser scanner could do the job.
I fact, it appears that the 3D data are produced when moving a laser line.
Considering that I would like to know if the laser line do not move (in the position I would like to realize my cross section) could I produce a simple 3D cross section ?

Does someone have a opinion on that ?

Thank you in advance.

A.A.
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Re: Profiling

Postby MagWeb » Fri Oct 17, 2014 2:15 pm

Hope I got you right.

There's one big problem: DAVID supports meshes. A single line result (a not moving laser) cann't be meshed (which needs at least two laser poses to build triangles) but its result are vertiex data only.
Your single line is stored in the depth image result and it is visible there. ASFAIK theres no way to export that depthmap (you'd need some screenshot solution) and DAVID's export as a mesh fails on a single line (due to the fact that the result cann't be a mesh).

On the other hand: using a mirror cabinet you could get a 360° profile... (e.g.:http://wiki.david-3d.com/scanning_with_mirrors)

------

It might work to grab a few frames of a moving laser where the laser stopps at the position where you ty to get the cross section.
This will produce a scanned mesh "ring" . You could export this result, fill the section "hole" in some third party app (e.g. Meshmixer) and discard the source "ring"....
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Re: Profiling

Postby alterco » Fri Oct 17, 2014 4:12 pm

Thank you for your answer.
It pushes me to pursue.

And I really like your idea of an aborted scan.

I think I will give a try.

A.A.
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Re: Profiling

Postby fred_dot_u » Fri Oct 17, 2014 6:23 pm

3d printers use programs to convert a 3d file such as that generated by DLS into a series of "slices" in order to print the model. I would expect that one could find a program that will allow you to import your scan and select the appropriate slice for your purposes.

The first thought that comes to mind may be found on the instructables web site, along the lines of laser cutting cardboard to make 3d stacked models. I was not able to locate anything during a quick search, but changed my terms and found this:

http://wiki.netfabb.com/Export_and_Save_Slices

A quick google search for "extract slices from stl file" gave me the above link and there were many others I did not follow.
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Re: Profiling

Postby fred_dot_u » Sat Oct 18, 2014 1:50 am

Just for the fun of it, I continued the research for building slices from a model. I wasn't really happy with the netfabb answer, as it's very expensive to have that one feature. I have located a free program, commonly used by many in the world of 3d, meshmixer from autocad.

http://www.meshmixer.com/download.html

One feature that caught my eye is listed as a new function of the program, the ability to slice a 3d model. I downloaded and installed the program, then loaded in a sample model from .obj (import) and used the Edit, Make Slices function. Playing around with that feature alone makes it worth the download. One can set the direction of slices, the thickness of the slice and see a preview of how the model appears when sliced. Performing the action then presents a list of .obj files, one for each slice. Select the slice you desire, click Export, select the format, and you have the output you desire/require.

This may be your best option and it was easy enough to figure out in a matter of minutes.
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